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Uganda: Alumni reflections on St Denis.

Enough of me telling you what's going on here in Uganda, here are two accounts by St Denis graduates telling us what they are doing now and how the skills they learnt at St Denis are helping them. The accounts are summaries of interviews recently recorded for the upcoming St Denis film: 

              

Buuza graduated from St Denis around 4 years ago and is now interning as a lab assistant in preparation for his further study next year as a pharmacist. Whilst at St Denis, he was one of the students to assist in establishing the first matooke trees in the now flourishing plantation. He remembers how he learnt how to space the trees appropriately, dig away the weeds and apply composting material to the plantation to keep it healthy. Since he is interning now, he uses his plantation skills to work in a friend’s plantation in return for accommodation. “It is very important for students to learn practical business skills because after Senior 4 there are very few white collar jobs for those graduates. From St Denis Students know how to dig, look after animals and run simple businesses. They know how to make profits from small capital.”

Rogers left St Denis in 2008 and was also one of the students to assist in establishing the first matooke trees in the plantation. He learnt many valuable skills in establishing the plantation including how to cut away dead fibres to prevent the growth of banana weevils. Rogers inherited some land from his father around 2 years ago and decided to establish his own plantation since he had the skills to do so from his time at St Denis. He is now studying Accountancy and using his banana plantation to partly fund his studies. “You cannot go far in your business when you are not skilled… If it wasn’t for St Denis I wouldn’t have had the interest in establishing the plantation I have now.”


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